Dig Into Spring

Dig Into Spring

4 tips for your best garden yet.
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Whether you’re a novice or veteran gardener, we’ve got a collection of easy ways to help create the garden of your dreams, without a lot of work. All it comes down to is some careful planning, digging in (literally!) and having fun.

Do some homework

 
If you’re new to gardening, check the USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map to see which type of plants will flourish in your region. For veterans, analyze your results from last year and chat with neighbors to learn from their mistakes or successes or visit popular, reputable online message boards such as the Helpful Gardener or visit the National Gardening Association’s Facebook page.

Compost like crazy

 
Any level of gardener needs some serious compost. Create your own with cut grass, leaves and kitchen scraps. Or buy a ready-made bag at a garden store. Then, dig about 2–4 inches deep, put the compost in the dirt and mix with the rest of the soil before planting.

Turn heads and noses

 
Why spend time planting a so-so garden when all it takes is a little more effort to create one with WOW power? Consider color (think baptisia, goldenrod, purple coneflowers and day lilies), fragrance (how about lavender and Russian sage?) and texture (we like ornamental grasses like blue wheat grass, sedum or foxtail, which are quite easy to grow).

Water away

 
Plants and flowers love a big drink in the morning before temperatures begin to rise. Give your greenery a good soak because light watering doesn’t encourage deep root growth. For more detailed advice, see our article Plant Watering 101.

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comments (6)
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recent comments
5/5/2012 , 
b  g.
The Zone map itself was easy but the ledgend was too small. I could not read it. I do know I am in Zone 7 (or 6).
4/16/2012 , 
MICHAEL  H.
what i did growing tomatoes,dug rows beside my plants and put my cow droping (yes i said cow fresh stuff)at one end of the row then watered it,letting the water spread it down the row,it didn't burn the plants,but did have some very large tomatoes to eat.not to much of the cow stuff,you can over do it.sorry about the next door.enjoy..
4/6/2012 , 
Kendra  T.
Watering at night encourages mold. Early morning is best because the leaves have time to dry off before the mid day heat of the sun. At least that is how we do it in the midwest.
4/4/2012 , 
Michael  J.
Thanks! Interesting and helpful, but VERY hard to read against green dot background.
4/4/2012 , 
Christina  K.
"Plants and flowers love a big drink in the morning before temperatures begin to rise. " WHAT?! You better mean "morning" as in 12 am to say 3 am. You would not want to water your plants at a time when the sun will hit wet leaves, the water droplets magnify the sun & this will only cause sunburnt plants. Water at night to prevent sunburnt plants. Many gardeners will say night watering attracts grubs and other pests, but the trick is not to over saturate the garden.
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